You’re Not Good Enough

hand-1923005_1920What?  Why not?  This is usually our first response.  But maybe, the best response is “for what?”

What is “not good enough?”  Most of the time it is someone else’s expectation of us.  Are they right?  And if they are, should you really be worried about that?  Yeah, maybe, if they are paying you for your performance.  You could have an off day or you are ill, but they should give you a break for that.  If you are consistently not up to the expectations they have outlined for you, well then, you probably aren’t good enough.  But you might be good enough for someone else.

And you are damn sure good enough for you.

Always remember that the Creator made you and you were absolutely good enough then, so why wouldn’t you be now?

Expectations.  Others, of course, but really of yourself.  How many times do you let yourself down, because you don’t think you are good enough or capable enough?  Do you start with the self-expectation that you aren’t, so you somehow sabotage your efforts to prove yourself right?

How would that change if you believed, or just known, that you could do something?  If that is true, you are most likely already there and don’t even think about it.

Expectations can push us or punish us.  They should push us and make us want to grow, to change, to be better than we were the day before.  Expectations should help others strive too.  Rather than punishing someone for not meeting our expectations, tell them how you feel.  “I don’t like it when you don’t pick up after yourself.  The room looks dirty and cluttered.  I get tired because I feel like I have to pick up your stuff.”  Rather than telling them they are stupid or lazy or dictating that they have to do something, you are bringing it back to how you feel.  Sharing your feelings is healthy and gives the other person the opportunity to do better.

And then they can change their expectations and see that they are good enough.

2 thoughts on “You’re Not Good Enough

    1. I totally agree. Especially when they come in a negative form from a parent to a child. We, then, often grow up more afraid of success than we are of failure. Thank you for your comment!

      Like

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